KidsReadyNC

KidsReadyNC Community Partners!

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KidsReadyNC Participants Reflect on Initiative Impact (Fall 2019)

From April 2018 to October 2019, the Institute for Emerging Issues served as organizing partner on the KidsReadyNC initiative, coordinating a four-person support team of content and process experts delivering technical assistance to leaders from four participating communities (Catawba, Chowan, Randolph, Rockingham counties). 


The question the KidsReadyNC initiative successfully answered was whether a (mostly) virtual assistance model could strengthen leadership capacity in local early childhood development systems in lower-resourced communities and do so much more cheaply than conventional face-to-face support efforts.


Over eighteen months, the KidsReadyNC initiative increased leadership capacity while generating early “wins” and leaving each community with both strategies and momentum to generate positive childhood outcomes over time. 


The initiative’s final report highlights key learnings from this initiative and offers guidance for others considering a virtual support approach. Understanding the value and limitations of virtual support approaches is especially attractive in a time of social distancing and mid- to long-term challenges to governmental budgets. While the active support phase of the KidsReadyNC initiative concluded before the pandemic began, an Addendum to this report offers updated reflections from the participating communities on the use of virtual support technologies following a year of working remotely. 


Please direct any question about this initiative to:

Patrick Cronin
Assistant Director for Policy and Programs
Institute for Emerging Issues, NC State University
pcronin@ncsu.edu | 919-513-3540


The Institute for Emerging Issues is grateful for the support received from
The Belk Foundation, The Duke Endowment and The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute.
The KidsReadyNC initiative would not have been possible without it. 

The Institute would also like to thank the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond’s Community Development Department for its contributions.