Text, Talk, Future

In today’s world, young people often need additional education or job training in order to have successful, productive lives following high school. Right now, only 58 percent of North Carolinians go on to pursue additional education or job training following high school. We want to help change that.

Text, Talk, Future is an initiative of the Institute for Emerging Issues at North Carolina State University. Using this text-based platform, small groups of students receive discussion questions to start the conversation about what’s next after high school. Questions invite young people to share their interests and to identify their academic strengths. Texted questions also provide a chance for students to begin to think about what kind of career, education or job training they might want to seek following high school.

This program is based on Text, Talk, Act, a successful initiative with participation from thousands of young people in all 50 states. Here is what a few of them have to say about the experience:

  • Participating “made me feel closer to my peers.”
  • This is a “unique new way of using social media to inspire minds and conversations.“
  • The discussion was “open, honest, and had real meaning.”
  • Participating in Text, Talk, Act “makes me feel like I’m not alone.”

Interested in hosting a Text, Talk, Act event at your school? Contact Emerging Leaders Maggie Woods at mjwoods2@ncsu.edu.

 


Text, Talk, Future Resources for Students

Below are additional resources for students as they explore opportunities for their future. Resources are divided into relevant categories.

Jump To:

Exploring Career Options | Finding the Right College | Funding College
Internships and Job Shadowing | Things to Get You Thinking


Resources:

EXPLORING CAREER OPTIONS
  • The College Board’s BigFuture website allows you to explore careers and college majors that align with your interests. It also provides examples of how others have used this tool to make their own career choices.
  • The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook identifies hundreds of occupations and occupation groups as well as identifying the duties, education and training requirements, standard pay for each.
  • Career Planning for High Schoolers,” an article published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, focuses on how high school students can actively explore potential career paths and identifies the importance of starting this thought process early.
  • How to Choose a Career That’s Best for You” poses critical questions that should be considered by all people when choosing career paths. Tim Tyrell-Smith discusses natural talents, work styles, and stress-management among many other though provoking topics to get readers thinking about what they want, and who they are. (Note: This article is from 2010, so some information is outdated, but the questions posed are still helpful today!)
  • My Next Move is a search engine that allows you to search careers by key words, industries and interests. Use this tool to further explore how your interests relate to future career paths!
  • What factors go into choosing a career? This infographic touches on growing and declining industries, quality of life, and unemployment.
  • A Guide for Students and the Confused” is a simple infographic that encourages you to assess your skills, do research, and be open-minded about what your career path looks like- it’s not always a straight line. Quick note, this is a British website, so when they say “degree subject” they mean “college major” in American English.
  • Which Career is Right for Me?” breaks down different fields of work in a way that is easy to understand and connects individual skills with potential careers.

FINDING THE RIGHT COLLEGE
  • The College Foundation of North Carolina has a wealth of resources that can help you “plan, apply and pay for college” and help you plan for a career after high school.
  • ACT’s website not only provides information about the ACT testing process, it also includes career readiness information. Make sure you check out the World-of-Work Map that shows “how occupations relate to each other based on work tasks.”
  • The College Board covers a multitude of resources for high school students, from PSAT and SAT prep, to AP practice exams, college search and planning guides, and how to develop a financial aid profile to help apply for aid from nonfederal financial aid programs.
  • UNIGO is one of the most popular college search, college match, scholarship match, and student loan information websites for college-bound high school students. It’s easy to navigate and provides resources for more than 650 universities across the nation.

FUNDING COLLEGE
  • The College Foundation of North Carolina has a wealth of resources that can both help you “plan, apply and pay for college” and help you plan for a career after high school.
  • The College Board covers a multitude of resources for high school students, from PSAT and SAT prep, to AP practice exams, college search and planning guides. It also shows you how to develop a financial aid profile to apply for aid from nonfederal financial aid programs.
  • UNIGO is one of the most popular college search, college match, scholarship match, and student loan information websites for college-bound high school students. It’s easy to navigate and provides resources for more than 650 universities across the nation.
  • Quest Bridge is a national nonprofit that connects the nations most exceptional, low-income youth with leading colleges and opportunities. They offer a resource center to help plan, apply and pay for college, a “college match” platform, and advice on how to be a competitive applicant.
  • Good Call provides a wealth of resources on how to make good life decisions, covering topics ranging from how to build good credit and balancing personal finances, to finding a job after college, how to make a career change, and how to pay for college.
  • Scholarships.com provides resources to help college bound individuals search for the university that is right for them and provides a database of scholarships to help fund your education.

INTERNSHIPS AND JOB SHADOWING
  • This Big Future article explains what an internship is, and why starting an internship in high school is valuable. There are also stories of real high school students and how an internship helped them prepare for their future.
  • This resource from The Society for Human Resource Management discusses how high school internships benefit students and employers.
  • Youth Rules offers many resources for youth employees. There are specific labor laws that apply to employees under the age of 18. Whether you are job shadowing or in an internship, these laws are important to know for your own safety, especially in a hands-on position.
  • The STEM Net offers a listing of all STEM internships for high school students. STEM is Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. This is a Maryland based organization, but many of the positions listed are nationally based.
  • WakeMed Health & Hospitals offers multiple learning opportunities for both high school and college students in North Carolina.
  • Blogpost Prep Scholar with everything you need to know about job shadowing, a complete guide!
  • Education Week discussing how job shadowing in high school can help students figure out their career pathway.
  • Live Career checklist for high school students to prepare for a job shadowing experience.
  • Information from CFNC on how to arrange a job shadow or informational interview.

THINGS TO GET YOU THINKING
  • Not sure what you want to be when you grow up? If you don’t know what you want to do for the rest of your life, this is the video for you. In her TED Talk, Emilie Wapnick provides insight into what she calls “multipotentialities,” or those with a range of interests that may influence career paths.
  • In Scott Dinsmore’s TED Talk, he details how he went from working a job he hated to finding a career that was truly meaningful to him. Watch this video to see how Scott discovered what was important to him and how he made a career of it.
  • eLearningNC.gov provides general and specialized information about eLearning (learning utilizing electronic technologies to access educational curriculum outside of a traditional classroom). It discusses different types of eLearning including: distance education, continuing education, computerized electronic learning and online learning.
  • NC Career’s Reality Check is the North Carolina Department of Commerce’s new online tool designed to estimate the income necessary to support your desired lifestyle based on where you live in the state of North Carolina.

 


THANK YOU TO OUR TEXT, TALK, FUTURE SPONSORS